Mallaig


Mallaig is the terminus of the West  Highland line extension, opened in 1901, and is situated on a rocky hillside beside the Sound of Sleat, with views (and CalMac ferries) across the sea to Skye and the Small Islands (Eigg, Rum, Muck and Canna). There is also a ferry from Mallaig to Loch Nevis, Knoydart, and the remote village of Inverie as well as wildlife cruises and private hire provided by Western Isles Cruises.  There is a wide variety of accommodation and restaurants.

Mallaig was originally established to act as the service port for the new railway to exploit the large quantities of herring which frequented the seas off the west coast of Scotland. With the coming of the railway it was possible to have freshly caught herring landed and loaded on the fish vans at Mallaig and delivered by train to London for sale at the London Billingsgate market the following day.  The irony is that, although Mallaig remains a significant fishing port, no fish are any longer transported by rail and the line’s principle custom is the tourist traveller.

There are four trains from Glasgow via Fort William every weekday (fewer on Sundays). Mallaig is also the terminus for the Jacobite steam train between Fort William and Mallaig. This is a very popular service and prior booking is essential to guarantee a seat.

 

Click for Panorama

 

The busy fishing harbour and ferry port of Mallaig.

The train has just left Mallaig on its journey back to Fort William. For the first mile it runs parallel to the coast of the Sound of Sleat.

 

The Jacobite steam train prepares to depart from Mallaig on its 40 mile return journey to Fort William.

The Jacobite steam train prepares to depart from Mallaig on its 40 mile return journey to Fort William.

 

The Mallaig ferries moored for the evening. 

The Mallaig ferries moored for the evening. 

The Mallaig ferries moored for the evening. 

The Mallaig ferries moored for the evening.